People in Southwest Florida who get injured in accidents generally know what to expect from the type of injury they’ve received. In most cases, the location an injury occurs on the body will tell both doctors and accident victims exactly what to expect. A broken leg means mobility issues until it heals. A lung injury usually means difficulty breathing.

Unfortunately, when it comes to harm diagnosed as a brain injury, the field of possibility suddenly opens up, making for a more complex and more potentially harmful situation.

It’s Not Just One Thing

The crucial issue with the brain is that unlike a kidney, or a thigh bone, it is not designed to perform only one function. The brain is like the central processing unit of the human body. It’s the organ that runs autonomic functions like breathing or blood circulation. But it is also responsible for voluntary actions, such as using fingers to type out a reply on the phone or using both hands and feet to drive a car. On top of that, however, it’s also responsible for maintaining advanced cerebral functions such as memory, emotion, and identity.

In other words, the brain controls everything in the body, meaning that if there is an injury to the brain, many functions can be potentially affected. That requires much more time and care to address appropriately.

A Variety Of Effects

Because the brain is responsible for the smooth operation of the organs, autonomic functions, voluntary and cerebral functions, this means a huge variety of injuries are possible. One injury to the brain may result in someone with poor reflex control who can no longer stop hands from trembling. Another injury may result in someone experiencing partial paralysis in the leg, making normal movement more challenging without using a cane.

Other injuries may affect the personality, such as chronic anxiety, or even affect the way a person processes the world, such as losing the sense of smell or no longer being able to see things correctly because perceiving light is now painful.

Not Always Immediate

One of the more complicating factors surrounding brain injuries is the potential for a delayed effect. If you break your arm or a rib, you know immediately. If you suffer from a torn muscle or punctured lung, the effects are instantaneous. This is only sometimes true with a brain injury and not for every possible symptom.

A concussion is one of the easier, more immediate, and superficial symptoms to deal with in a brain injury. Symptoms like disorientation, memory loss, and confusion are quick to see and diagnose. However, other consequences of a brain injury may only make themselves evident much later. Depression, unstable emotional states, and even sexual impotence may all be symptoms that only manifest later, but these can arguably have a much more significant impact since they may be permanent.

If you’ve received a brain injury in Southwest Florida due to someone else’s negligence, the circumstances may put you in a situation that goes far beyond a straightforward personal injury case. Talk to a personal injury attorney experienced with traumatic brain injury to ensure you get the help you need.