West Coast Trial Lawyers Blog

Latest from West Coast Trial Lawyers Blog - Page 2

The parents of an 18-year-old man who was fatally stabbed in the heart in the parking lot of the Rose Bowl in Pasadena reportedly sued the group that operates the stadium, Rose Bowl Operating Co., for negligence. The family alleges their son was killed by a member of a cleaning crew, whose members were not properly screened for criminal backgrounds. The city owns the arena, but it is run by the aforementioned nonprofit.   Kamryn Stone, a recent high school graduate, was stabbed outside the stadium just after 11 p.m. on Sept. 14, 2019, after a game in which the…
The cases against the automaker Tesla involving its Autopilot are reportedly growing, and fueling concerns over the technology’s shortcomings — especifically those related to the many car crashes it has been involved in. According to the New York Times, the incidents and the resulting lawsuits also call into question the development of similar systems used by rival carmakers.    The latest incident that’s now the subject of a lawsuit against the company involves Benjamin Maldonado and his teenage son. Driving back from a soccer tournament on a California freeway in August 2019, his Ford Explorer pickup was hit by a…
From a minor fall when riding a bicycle to a serious car collision — there are many causes of traumatic brain injury. Typically associated with the latter, the German research team at BG Kliniken reportedly found that there has been a shift in the age group most frequently affected and that there is a discernible correlation between the severity of a traumatic brain injury, age, and cause.   A traumatic brain injury, or TBI, is any injury to the skull, with or without fracture, that involves damage to the brain. Just like the causes, the symptoms can also be…
In a newly released study, researchers reportedly confirmed what commuters have known for years: by making driving more convenient, transportation planners are basically ensuring that their communities are choked by gridlock and everyone out on the road has a slower route to their destinations.    In the new study, a coalition of academics from around the world modeled what would happen if all residents of a car-centric city made their transportation choices solely on the basis of how much time they would save by taking the fastest mode available to them, which, for most of them, would be a…
The stock trading app Robinhood reportedly settled the wrongful death lawsuit over the suicide of a 20-year-old college student who took his life after thinking he lost $730,000 on the app. The company disclosed the settlement with Alex Kearns’s parents in its S-1 filing, though the terms were not disclosed.   In its recent public filing for an IPO, Robinhood reportedly said that the lawsuit was “dismissed with prejudice following a settlement between the parties.” The Kearn’s had filed the lawsuit in state court in Santa Clara County, California, back in Feb. claiming the no-fee brokerage preys on inexperienced and…
FinanceBuzz recently released their list naming which U.S. cities are most focused on the future. Despite the city’s pollution problem, Los Angeles still managed to come in at no. 14 on the list based on its carbon footprint and partly on its bike score.   As the publication noted, some cities are adapting more easily than others in an ever evolving world. “Cities that take proactive steps in the present will have the easiest time of all [in the future],” they wrote. Because of this, they set out to find which U.S. cities are best and worst when it comes…
The latest Senate transportation bill would reportedly make it legal for freight companies to hire teenagers to drive big trucks. Some advocates are now saying that this, among other dangerous new policies, have no place in federal law.   A bipartisan amendment from Committee Chair Maria Cantwell (D-WA) and minority member Todd Young (R-IN) would reportedly establish a pilot program to train 3,000 new drivers between the ages of 18 and 20 to pilot the largest trucks that roll through U.S. communities. The nonprofit Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety recently sent an open letter to senior officials on the…
Much like a camping tent, the body doesn’t stand up by itself, it needs structure. That would be the spine, in this case. A complex organization of bones, cartilage, ligaments, nervous tissue, and muscle, the spine keeps the body upright. It also protects the spinal cord, which is part of the central nervous system that joins the brain to the rest of the body, creating an electrical connection that enables things like breathing, digestive, bladder and sexual function, sensation, and movement. Without a strong, healthy spine, the body simply doesn’t work.   As neurologist Florian P. Thomas, M.D., Ph.D., chair…
Seven children were reportedly injured in a school bus crash, after the vehicle jumped a fence and slammed into the corner of a house in Santa Ana, California. According to the California Highway Patrol, the crash occurred just after 1 p.m. in the 500 block of Daisy Avenue.   According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)’s Large Bus and Truck Facts 2017, school buses accounted for 40% of all buses involved in fatal crashes from 2007 to 2017 in the U.S.    Of the kids on board, three suffered serious injuries and the other four declined…
For many drivers during the coronavirus pandemic, open roads meant the perfect opportunity to speed — roads were actually deadlier in 2020. And now, a new paper showed that open roads, speeding, and other dangerous driving behaviors go hand-in-hand. The results reportedly argue that human perception and behavior offer some explanations as to why people speed and drive dangerously.   The emptier roads in California led to more speeding, which then led to more fatalities, since the collisions increased in severity. Citations issued by the state highway patrol for speeding over 100 miles per hour roughly doubled to…